Coronavirus has now spread to every continent except Antarctica

Coronavirus has now spread to every continent except Antarctica

Hong Kong (CNN)Public health officials warned Wednesday that the spread of the novel coronavirus is inching closer toward meeting the definition of a global pandemic, as the number of cases outside mainland China continues to grow, including in South Korea where a US soldier has tested positive for the virus.

Brazil announced its first case of coronavirus today, marking the first time the virus has been reported in South America. The outbreak has now spread to six of the world’s seven continents. It has not yet reached Antarctica.

Iran and Italy are also grappling with major outbreaks within their borders that have turned deadly, and a top official from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warned that the United States could see the virus spread within its borders.

    “Ultimately we expect we will see community spread in this country. It’s not so much a question of if this will happen anymore, but rather more a question of exactly when this will happen and how many people in this country will have severe illness,” said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, the director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

    South Korea currently has the largest outbreak outside mainland China, with more than 1,200 people infected — including the first US soldier — and at least 12 dead. Iran’s health ministry has confirmed at least 139 cases and 19 fatalities. In Italy, at least 374 people have been infected and 12 have been killed, while Algeria, Croatia, mainland Spain and Switzerland all announced their first confirmed cases.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has so far held off on classifying the coronavirus’ spread as a global pandemic, but the outbreak appears to be getting closer to meeting the global health body’s definition of one.

    The CDC’s Messonnier said Tuesday that the situation has met two of the criteria for a pandemic: “the fact that this virus has caused illness — including illness that has resulted in death — and sustained person-to-person spread.”

    “As community spread is detected in more and more countries, the world moves closer towards meeting the third criteria: worldwide spread of the new virus,” she said.

    To date, the virus has killed more than 2,760 people globally, 2,715 of whom are in mainland China. China’s National Health Commission reported that 406 confirmed cases were identified on Tuesday — all but five in hard-hit Hubei province — and 52 people were killed by the virus. The total number of people infected in mainland China is now 78,064, bringing the global total to 80,970.

    The situation has rattled global markets and led to concern about the long term economic impact of the virus.

    Investors and economists have been particularly concerned about how the continued shutdown of factories in China could affect global supply chains, but the new outbreaks in two major economies — Italy and South Korea — have rattled markets and dashed hopes of a speedy recovery, sparking this week’s worldwide stock rout.

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    South Korean outbreak spreads to the military

    South Korean authorities are attempting to contain an outbreak that has gone from just 51 people infected last week to at least 1,260 as of Wednesday. The outbreak began in the southern city of Daegu and was centered around the Shincheonji religious group, but the virus appears to have spread now beyond practitioners.

    Twenty members of the South Korean military have been confirmed infected, and the country’s defense ministry has placed significant restrictions on soldiers leaving their bases due to fears surrounding the virus. On Wednesday, it was announced that a US service member stationed in South Korea tested positive for the virus, according to US Forces Korea statement.

    The soldier, who is stationed at Camp Carroll which is approximately 20 kilometers (12.4 miles) from the city of Daegu, is the first US service member to test positive for the novel coronavirus.

    “The patient, a 23-year old male, is currently in self quarantine at his off-base residence. He visited Camp Walker on 24 February and Camp Carroll 21-25 February. KCDC and USFK health professionals are actively conducting contact tracing to determine whether any others may have been exposed,” the statement said.

    The virus’ spread also prompted South Korea and the United States to scale back joint military drills, according to three US officials.

    The three officials said this would be the first major impact of coronavirus on US military readiness, according to the officials. Without the full exercise, the US could lose ground in being able to quickly conduct future operations in a coordinated and highly synchronized manner with South Korea against North Korea in the event of a crisis, one of the officials said.

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    Iranian health official infected

    Tehran continues to grapple with a significant outbreak that one lawmaker in the holy city of Qom, the epicenter of the Iranian outbreak, said has killed as many as 50 people, though the country’s health ministry has denied his claims.

    Among the infected is Iran’s deputy health minister Iraj Harirchi. Harirchi appeared on television sweaty and ill to warn Iranians of coronavirus Monday, only to test positive for coronavirus on Tuesday.

    In a news conference on national television, Harirchi coughed and wiped sweat from his face using tissues on several occasions. He was later diagnosed with coronavirus, according to state media.

    Across the Middle East, flights from Iran have been halted and borders with the country have been closed as the region tries to keep the spread of a deadly coronavirus at bay. Several countries have also issued travel bans for the country.

    The heavy economic sanctions imposed against Iran by the US and other bodies have made tackling the disease harder, with the country struggling to access novel coronavirus test kits, a board member of Iran’s Association of Medical Equipment Importers told the semi-official news agency ILNA on Sunday.

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    Italian officials try to calm fears

    The worst outbreak outside Asia is in Italy, where authorities were on the defensive Tuesday as they faced tough questions over the country’s handling of the deadly virus as it spreads across the country’s northern regions.

    Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte tried to allay fears that the central government has no control over the affected regions after he was forced to admit that a hospital in the northern town of Codogno had mishandled the region’s first coronavirus case and had contributed to the deadly virus’ spread.

    The cases are heavily concentrated in the region of Lombardy where 212 infections have been confirmed. Around 100,000 people in Lombardy and nearby Veneto are facing travel and other restrictions.

    Conte on Monday night said that the hospital that treated the first coronavirus case in Codogno, known as Patient 1, had not followed protocol. Conte did not elaborate on what protocols were breached.

    It was clear “there has been a management of the hospital not entirely proper according to prudent protocols, which are recommended in these cases, and this has certainly contributed to the spread,” he said.

    Italian authorities have identified Patient 1 as a 38-year-old man, giving only the name Mattia.

    Mattia was originally in intensive care for respiratory problems at a hospital in Codogno, but is now being treated at the Policlinico San Matteo in Pavia, about 35 kilometers (21.7 miles) south of Milan, Italian Civil Protection Agency spokesman Juri Pittaluga told CNN. Mattia’s pregnant wife, Valentina, has also tested positive for the virus and is in the Sacco hospital in Milan, but her health condition is “not worrying at all,” Pittaluga said.

    Authorities in Italy have not yet identified Patient 0, the individual who suspected of bringing the coronavirus into the country.

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    Blame goes around in the United States

    Government officials in the United States spent much of Tuesday assessing the situation, with several leveling accusations against their domestic and international counterparts.

    US President Donald Trump has privately expressed frustration in recent days about some of the ways his administration is confronting a spreading coronavirus outbreak, according to people familiar with the conversations. Publicly, he has expressed optimism that the virus is “going to go away.”

    Lawmakers in Congress, meanwhile, have voiced concerns that more needs to be done. Republicans and Democrats alike have suggested that the Trump administration’s response has exposed vulnerabilities.

    “Looking ahead, we should be passing laws to make sure we have that manufacturing capability, that we have sufficient stockpiles. You know things expire. We need to be far more strategic about how we approach these things for the next potential pandemic,” Republican Sen. Ron Johnson said. “These are serious issues.”

    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was quick to criticize China and Iran, accusing both countries of a lack of transparency. He also alleged that attempts by both governments to stifle dissent has played a part in the virus’ spread.

      “Had China permitted its own and foreign journalists and medical personnel to speak and investigate freely, Chinese officials and other nations would have been far better prepared to address the challenge,” Pompeo said.

      The WHO has continually praised China’s response to the crisis, a move that has led critics to question the relationship between the two entities and whether the global health watchdog is sufficiently independent from Beijing, one of its most important financial patrons.

      CNN’s James Griffiths contributed reporting from Hong Kong; Ramin Mostaghim contributed reporting from Tehran; Sophie Jeong and Yoonjung Seo contributed reporting from Seoul; Angela Dewan contributed reporting from London; Nicola Ruotolo contributed reporting from Milan; and Kevin Liptak, Kaitlan Collins, Lauren Fox, Claire Foran and Barbara Starr contributed reporting from Washington

      All copyrights for this article are reserved to Viral 1 internet

      Coronavirus has now spread to every continent except Antarctica

      French say oops on viral Ivanka moment – POLITICO

      foreign policy

      ‘We didn’t anticipate the reaction,’ a French official said after a video released by the French government fueled concern about Ivanka Trump’s role in U.S. foreign policy.

      BRUSSELS — The French presidency is feeling a tad awkward after a video it posted of Ivanka Trump’s seemingly stilted interactions with foreign leaders went viral and spawned mockery, insisting that it “didn’t anticipate the reaction.”

      The video caught Ivanka Trump in a discussion with world leaders during her father President Donald Trump’s recent visit to the G-20 summit. And it has fueled concern that the president’s daughter is having undue influence on U.S. foreign policy.

      Advertisement

      In the clip, Ivanka Trump is shown trying to engage in a talk with a handful of foreign leaders, including French President Emmanuel Macron and Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund.

      The full context of the conversation isn’t clear, but at one point, British Prime Minister Theresa May says: “As soon as you charge them with that economic aspect of it, a lot of people start listening who otherwise wouldn’t listen.”

      “And the same with the defense side of it, in terms of the whole business that’s been, sort of, male-dominated,” Ivanka Trump then says, smiling.

      Lagarde, who had been nodding while May spoke, appears mystified by Trump’s comment and purses her lips. The IMF chief’s reaction alone has spawned numerous mocking tweets about the encounter.

      In a statement, an official with the Élysée — the French presidential palace — stressed that the French government often releases clips of such moments at summits.

      This particular one, the official said, “took place in the leaders’ lounge right before the sessions on gender equality of which Ivanka was one of the keynote speakers, so it wasn’t anything more than a moment of exchange like there were 100 more [of] with other leaders.”

      The official noted, however, that the clip was released at a time of “a larger narrative in the U.S. about Ivanka’s diplomatic role and that goes beyond us, of course,” but that it wasn’t the French government’s intention to feed into that narrative.

      “We didn’t anticipate the reaction, and once again, we are not responsible for the use made of the clip,” the official said.

      Even before Trump took office, his oldest daughter — who is officially one of his advisers in the White House — has at times played the role of diplomat, traveling with her father and meeting with foreign leaders. In 2017, she stunned foreign policy observers when she briefly took the U.S. president’s place at a meeting with other world leaders in Germany at the G-20 summit, a gathering of the world’s largest economies

      But even for her, Ivanka Trump was unusually out front this past week during her father’s trip to this year’s G-20 summit and then the Korean peninsula.

      She gave a video “readout” of the U.S. president’s discussions with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. And she popped up in group photos of meeting participants at the G-20.

      Ivanka Trump also joined her father as he walked over into North Korean territory along the Demilitarized Zone to briefly meet with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un. No sitting U.S. president had ever been inside North Korea before. Ivanka Trump described the experience as “surreal.”

      The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

      A White House official pointed out that Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe “invited Ivanka to speak at the G-20.”

      “Ivanka is the White House’s leading representative on issues of women’s empowerment, which was a primary theme of this year’s summit in Osaka,” Japan, said Jessica Ditto, White House deputy communications director.

      Ivanka Trump’s omnipresence fueled speculation about her future political plans — her father has suggested in the past that he’d be willing to nominate her for top diplomatic posts. It also spawned intense criticism about whether she had the proper background for the role she was playing.

      Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), a progressive and one of the most outspoken new members of Congress, tweeted out the video of Ivanka Trump with Lagarde, Macron and others. “It may be shocking to some, but being someone’s daughter actually isn’t a career qualification,” Ocasio-Cortez wrote.

      Plenty of observers saw humor in Ivanka Trump’s many appearances.

      On Twitter, using the hashtag #unwantedivanka, critics have been posting photoshopped pictures of historic — and fictional — events that now include Ivanka Trump. In one, she’s in the water alongside the characters Jack and Rose in the movie “Titanic.”

      Nahal Toosi reported from Washington.

      All copyrights for this article are reserved to Viral 1 internet

      Coronavirus has now spread to every continent except Antarctica

      Are K-Pop Stars the World’s Biggest ‘Influencers’? – WSJ



      July 15, 2019 11:31 am ET

      LAST MONTH IN PARIS, Korean rapper Mino appeared on the catwalk during Louis Vuitton’s spring 2020 fashion show. A member of the Korean pop (“K-Pop”) group Winner, Mino is one of the biggest celebrities of the moment. Within hours of the show, Korean pop culture websites like Soompi and Koreaboo picked up the news, as did American outlets like Vogue.com (which reported that Mino “stole the show”), E! Online and curiously, Yahoo Finance. A thread on the K-Pop Reddit forum, which boasts over 387,000 members, is dedicated to the walk. Mino’s own Instagram, followed by nearly 5 million fans, teems with comments such as “Congrats…

      All copyrights for this article are reserved to Viral 1 internet

      Trump Calls for Calm on Virus and Expands Travel Restrictions …

      Trump Calls for Calm on Virus and Expands Travel Restrictions …

      The announcement included elevated warnings against travel to specific regions in Italy and South Korea, and came after the U.S. recorded its first coronavirus death: a person near Seattle.

      Published Feb. 29, 2020Updated March 17, 2020

      Image

      President Trump said on Saturday that there was “no reason to panic” about the coronavirus.Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

      President Trump sought on Saturday to more aggressively address the coronavirus after weeks of confusion over his administration’s response, urging public calm and issuing new foreign travel warnings and restrictions.

      At a White House news conference, Mr. Trump acknowledged the first death recorded in the United States, in Washington State. Vice President Mike Pence said the administration was issuing its highest-level warning, known as a “do not travel” warning, to areas of Italy and South Korea most affected by the virus.

      The United States is also barring all travel to Iran, and barring entry to any foreign citizen who has visited Iran in the last 14 days. There will also be screenings of travelers coming from Italy and South Korea.

      Speaking later Saturday at the Conservative Political Action Conference, Mr. Trump also suggested the United States was ready to help Iranians amid an outbreak there.

      “If we can help the Iranians, we have the greatest health care professionals in the world,” he said, adding that “we would love to be able to help them.”

      “All they have to do is ask,” he said.

      Aiming to calm the public after the worst week for the stock market since 2008, the president, flanked by top federal public health officials, appealed to “the media and politicians and everybody else involved not do anything to incite a panic, because there’s no reason to panic at all.”

      In response to a question, Mr. Trump also said he was “very strongly” considering new travel restrictions along the southern border to contain the coronavirus. But he later walked back the possibility, saying “this is not a border that seems to be much of a problem right now.”

      He also denied that he had referred to the coronavirus as a “hoax” during a Friday night political rally in South Carolina. “The ‘hoax’ was used with respect to Democrats and what they were saying,” Mr. Trump said. At the rally, the president had said of Democrats: “This is their new hoax,” drawing swift condemnation from his political rivals.

      The outbreak is clearly becoming part of the presidential race. Michael R. Bloomberg’s campaign released a three-minute prerecorded address on the coronavirus outbreak, which it is paying to broadcast on network television Sunday night.

      Image

      Credit…Grant Hindsley for The New York Times

      A person near Seattle has become the first coronavirus patient to die in the United States, health officials said Saturday. The person was a patient at a hospital in Kirkland, Washington.

      In referring to the death at a news conference, President Trump said the victim was a “wonderful woman” in her 50s, but local officials later said the patient had been a man in his 50s. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention later clarified that the patient was, in fact, a man, and that the agency’s director had also misstated the patient’s sex at the president’s news conference.

      Washington State health officials also announced two cases of people tied to a nursing facility near Seattle and said more than 50 people in the facility had begun to show symptoms, a possible sign of an outbreak among a particularly vulnerable population.

      A health-care worker and a resident at the facility, Life Care Center of Kirkland, had both tested positive for the virus. There are 288 staff and residents at the facility.

      Governor Jay Inslee declared a state of emergency, directing state agencies to do everything reasonably possible to assist affected communities. The proclamation allows the use of the Washington National Guard, if necessary.

      Dr. Robert Redfield, the director of the C.D.C., said there was no evidence that the person had traveled recently or had contact with someone known to have the virus.

      Experts warn that cases of unknown origin are a worrying sign that the virus is spreading in this country. Similar cases also reported on Friday involved a high school student from north of Seattle; an employee of a school near Portland, Ore.; a woman in Santa Clara County, Calif., in the heart of Silicon Valley; and a man in southeastern England.

      Image

      Credit…The New York Times

      Of the nearly 87,000 coronavirus cases recorded globally as of Sunday, fewer than 7,200 were outside of mainland China.

      The Chinese authorities reported 573 new cases. That brings the country’s total to 79,824 since the outbreak began, a figure that includes people who have recovered or died. China also reported 35 new deaths on Sunday, a drop from the previous day’s toll of 47.

      The virus has now been detected in at least 59 countries. Qatar confirmed its first case on Saturday, a 36-year-old Qatari citizen who had been in quarantine since recently returning from Iran, the country’s health ministry said.

      Iran, which has been at the center of the virus’s spread in the region, confirmed an additional 205 cases on Saturday, bringing its official total to 593. The death toll rose by nine, to 43 — a number many public health experts say indicates a wider spread than officials have acknowledged.

      South Korea, which has the largest coronavirus outbreak outside China, reported 376 new cases on Sunday, bringing its total to 3,526.

      [Read: He blames ‘evil’ for South Korea’s coronavirus surge. Officials blame him.]

      Italy, the center of the outbreak in Europe, now has a total of 1,128 confirmed cases and 29 deaths. France has reported 100 cases and two deaths. Australia, which has 25 confirmed cases, reported its first death from the virus on Sunday.

      Image

      Credit…Chinatopix, via Associated Press

      The coronavirus and the flu are often compared these days. But what are their basic similarities and differences?

      So far, the coronavirus seems to be deadlier. On average, the seasonal flu strain kills about 0.1 percent of people who become infected. Early estimates of the death rate in the coronavirus outbreak’s epicenter in Wuhan, China, have been around 2 percent, though at least one medical journal claims it’s as low as 1.4 percent.

      The rate could fall if it turns out that many cases aren’t detected because they are so mild or even symptom-free.

      As with influenza, the coronavirus is most dangerous to people over the age of 65, or who have chronic illness or a weak immune system.

      And so far, the flu has sickened more people than the coronavirus. In the United States, there have been 32 million cases of flu, several hundred thousands hospitalizations and 18,000 deaths, according to the C.D.C. By contrast, just 70 people in the United States have been infected with the new coronavirus, and there has been one death, which was reported on Saturday.

      One area where the two ailments diverge is treatment. There is no approved antiviral drug for the coronavirus, but several are being tested. For those infected with any viral illness, doctors recommend rest, medicine to reduce pain and fever, and fluids to avoid dehydration. For the flu, doctors can offer four prescription medicines.

      There are no coronavirus vaccinations available, but one may be available in a year or two. Flu vaccines are widely available and generally 40 percent to 60 percent effective.

      A 78-year-old man died of the coronavirus early Sunday at a hospital in Perth, Australia, the first known death from the illness in that country, officials said. He had been a passenger aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship, where a large concentration of coronavirus infections emerged last month as it was docked in Japan.

      His death was announced by Andrew Robertson, chief health officer at the Western Australia Department of Health.

      The man’s wife, who had also been on the cruise ship and was later diagnosed with the virus, was in stable condition, Mr. Robertson said.

      Australia has so far reported 25 confirmed cases of the new virus, nine of which were associated with the Diamond Princess. Fifteen of these patients have recovered.

      “We still need to make the point very clear that there isn’t community spread within Australia,” Mr. Robertson said. “This very tragic case is still related to the Diamond Princess.”

      “The public shouldn’t be panicking at this stage,” he said.

      Image

      Credit…Kena Betancur/Getty Images

      The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Saturday that it was authorizing American laboratories to develop their own coronavirus tests, which should significantly increase the country’s testing capacity.

      The effect could be rapid. Some labs and private companies have applied for emergency approval for tests they have already created. If they have submitted evidence that the tests work, the labs and companies will be able to use them immediately, rather than wait for the F.D.A. to complete reviews and issue approvals.

      “This action today reflects our public health commitment to addressing critical public health needs and rapidly responding and adapting to this dynamic and evolving situation,” the F.D.A.’s commissioner, Stephen M. Hahn, said in a statement.

      Experts have been frustrated with the limited availability of coronavirus tests in the U.S., which until now could only be provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Broader testing will enable more rapid detection and isolation of people who have the coronavirus to help contain the spread of disease.

      Image

      Credit…Bryan Anselm for The New York Times

      Across the country, educators, businesses and local officials are beginning to confront the logistics of enduring a possible pandemic: school closings that could force millions of children to remain at home, emergency plans that would require employees to work remotely, communities scrambling to build up supplies.

      In plausible worst-case-scenarios given the pattern of the outbreak thus far, the country could experience acute shortages in ventilators, and also the health workers to operate them and care for patients; hospital beds; and masks and other protective equipment.

      On Saturday, the surgeon general warned the public against buying masks to keep the supply available to health care professionals.

      “Seriously people — STOP BUYING MASKS!” the surgeon general, Jerome M. Adams, said in a tweet on Saturday morning. “They are NOT effective in preventing general public from catching #Coronavirus, but if health care providers can’t get them to care for sick patients, it puts them and our communities at risk!”

      A federal 2005 projection forecast that a severe influenza pandemic would require mechanical ventilators for 740,000 critically ill people. But only about 62,000 full-featured ventilators were in hospitals across the country, a 2010 study found, and even if more have been added, most are in use.

      “Even during mild flu pandemics, most of our I.C.U.s are filled to the brim with severely ill patients on mechanical ventilation,” said Dr. Eric Toner, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and an expert on health care preparedness.

      “I hope and pray Covid-19 turns out to be a moderate pandemic, but if not, we’re in serious trouble,” he said, referring to the name given to the disease caused by the virus.

      Image

      Credit…Vahid Salemi/Associated Press

      Iran’s state media reported on Saturday that five members of Parliament had tested positive, adding to the coronavirus’s reach into the top tiers of the country’s politicians.

      Over the past week, Iran reported that seven government officials, including one of the country’s vice presidents, were infected. The country’s president, Hassan Rouhani, attended a meeting last week with at least one of them.

      Also infected is the son of a prominent politician who advises Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. The son, Faridedin Hadad Adel, who is also related to the ayatollah by marriage, tweeted that he had gotten the virus after visiting a school in the holy city of Qom, which is an epicenter of the virus in Iran.

      • Updated June 5, 2020

        • Does asymptomatic transmission of Covid-19 happen?

          So far, the evidence seems to show it does. A widely cited paper published in April suggests that people are most infectious about two days before the onset of coronavirus symptoms and estimated that 44 percent of new infections were a result of transmission from people who were not yet showing symptoms. Recently, a top expert at the World Health Organization stated that transmission of the coronavirus by people who did not have symptoms was “very rare,” but she later walked back that statement.

        • How does blood type influence coronavirus?

          A study by European scientists is the first to document a strong statistical link between genetic variations and Covid-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus. Having Type A blood was linked to a 50 percent increase in the likelihood that a patient would need to get oxygen or to go on a ventilator, according to the new study.

        • How many people have lost their jobs due to coronavirus in the U.S.?

          The unemployment rate fell to 13.3 percent in May, the Labor Department said on June 5, an unexpected improvement in the nation’s job market as hiring rebounded faster than economists expected. Economists had forecast the unemployment rate to increase to as much as 20 percent, after it hit 14.7 percent in April, which was the highest since the government began keeping official statistics after World War II. But the unemployment rate dipped instead, with employers adding 2.5 million jobs, after more than 20 million jobs were lost in April.

        • Will protests set off a second viral wave of coronavirus?

          Mass protests against police brutality that have brought thousands of people onto the streets in cities across America are raising the specter of new coronavirus outbreaks, prompting political leaders, physicians and public health experts to warn that the crowds could cause a surge in cases. While many political leaders affirmed the right of protesters to express themselves, they urged the demonstrators to wear face masks and maintain social distancing, both to protect themselves and to prevent further community spread of the virus. Some infectious disease experts were reassured by the fact that the protests were held outdoors, saying the open air settings could mitigate the risk of transmission.

        • How do we start exercising again without hurting ourselves after months of lockdown?

          Exercise researchers and physicians have some blunt advice for those of us aiming to return to regular exercise now: Start slowly and then rev up your workouts, also slowly. American adults tended to be about 12 percent less active after the stay-at-home mandates began in March than they were in January. But there are steps you can take to ease your way back into regular exercise safely. First, “start at no more than 50 percent of the exercise you were doing before Covid,” says Dr. Monica Rho, the chief of musculoskeletal medicine at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab in Chicago. Thread in some preparatory squats, too, she advises. “When you haven’t been exercising, you lose muscle mass.” Expect some muscle twinges after these preliminary, post-lockdown sessions, especially a day or two later. But sudden or increasing pain during exercise is a clarion call to stop and return home.

        • My state is reopening. Is it safe to go out?

          States are reopening bit by bit. This means that more public spaces are available for use and more and more businesses are being allowed to open again. The federal government is largely leaving the decision up to states, and some state leaders are leaving the decision up to local authorities. Even if you aren’t being told to stay at home, it’s still a good idea to limit trips outside and your interaction with other people.

        • What’s the risk of catching coronavirus from a surface?

          Touching contaminated objects and then infecting ourselves with the germs is not typically how the virus spreads. But it can happen. A number of studies of flu, rhinovirus, coronavirus and other microbes have shown that respiratory illnesses, including the new coronavirus, can spread by touching contaminated surfaces, particularly in places like day care centers, offices and hospitals. But a long chain of events has to happen for the disease to spread that way. The best way to protect yourself from coronavirus — whether it’s surface transmission or close human contact — is still social distancing, washing your hands, not touching your face and wearing masks.

        • What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

          Common symptoms include fever, a dry cough, fatigue and difficulty breathing or shortness of breath. Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. The C.D.C. has also added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

        • How can I protect myself while flying?

          If air travel is unavoidable, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself. Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A study from Emory University found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

        • How do I take my temperature?

          Taking one’s temperature to look for signs of fever is not as easy as it sounds, as “normal” temperature numbers can vary, but generally, keep an eye out for a temperature of 100.5 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. If you don’t have a thermometer (they can be pricey these days), there are other ways to figure out if you have a fever, or are at risk of Covid-19 complications.

        • Should I wear a mask?

          The C.D.C. has recommended that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting new concerns that the coronavirus is being spread by infected people who have no symptoms. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

        • What should I do if I feel sick?

          If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus or think you have, and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.

        • How do I get tested?

          If you’re sick and you think you’ve been exposed to the new coronavirus, the C.D.C. recommends that you call your healthcare provider and explain your symptoms and fears. They will decide if you need to be tested. Keep in mind that there’s a chance — because of a lack of testing kits or because you’re asymptomatic, for instance — you won’t be able to get tested.


      State media reported that an Iranian parliament member had died from respiratory failure after being admitted to a hospital with flulike symptoms, raising questions about whether that was also a coronavirus case. The member, Mohamad Ali Ramezani, was from Gilan Province, which has emerged as a second epicenter of the epidemic within Iran, after Qom.

      The outbreak has brought life to a standstill in Iran. Officials have temporarily shut down schools, universities and canceled all public gatherings, according to state media.

      Masoumeh Aghapour Alishahi, one of the parliamentarians who has tested positive, released a video message asking Mr. Rouhani to shut down all education centers until the crisis is contained.

      The Center of Human Rights in Iran, a research and advocacy group based in the United States, has expressed concerns over reports that prisoners in the country are not being protected from the virus and lack access to medicine, hygiene and sanitary products.

      Asadollah Abbasi, a member of Parliament who acts as the body’s spokesman, was quoted in state media as saying that the five positive cases had emerged from testing 100 lawmakers. He said other lawmakers would be tested in their own hometowns or in the capital, Tehran. Iran’s Parliament has 290 representatives.

      The country’s death toll rose to 43 from 34 on Friday and the number of infected was up to 593 from 388, according to officials cited in state media. Health experts have said that multiplying each death by 50 is offers a rough estimate of the true number of cases, and experts say the real number of cases is likely much higher than what is being reported.

      A mandatory quarantine by the U.S. government resulted in nearly $4,000 in medical bills for a man and his 3-year-old daughter, who were both evacuated from Wuhan, China.

      “I assumed it was all being paid for,” Frank Wucinski said. “We didn’t have a choice. When the bills showed up it was just a pit in my stomach, like how do I pay for this?”

      Mr. Wucinski and his daughter Annabel were among dozens of Americans the government flew back and put under quarantine in February. His wife, who is not a U.S. citizen and remains in China, developed pneumonia that doctors think resulted from Covid-19, the disease caused by the respiratory virus.

      Image

      Credit…Courtesy Frank Wucinski

      Mr. Wucinski and Annabel spent two weeks in quarantine and both repeatedly tested negative for the virus.

      After being released from quarantine, the pair received a pile of medical bills: $3,918 in charges from hospital doctors, radiologists and an ambulance company.

      A spokesman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention declined to comment on whether it would pay the bills of patients kept in mandatory isolation.

      Mr. Wucinski received a document upon leaving quarantine that directed him to contact a government email address with any medical bills, but he has yet to receive a response. However, a Rady Children’s Hospital spokesman said that the bill from their physicians had been sent in error and that the family would not be held responsible for the charges.

      The leader of the United Nations has recommended sharply reducing attendance at the March 9-20 annual meeting of the Commission on the Status of Women at the world body’s New York headquarters because of concerns about the coronavirus epidemic.

      If the commission approves the recommendation on Monday, as expected, it will be the latest major gathering to be canceled or curtailed because of the coronavirus epidemic.

      The annual meeting is ordinarily attended by more than 7,000 people, including top ministers and diplomats from among the 193 member states of the United Nations. This year’s session was considered especially significant as a venue to assess the progress on gender equality — or lack of it — that has been made in the quarter-century since the 1995 Beijing Declaration, a United Nations document that asserted “women’s rights are human rights” and committed to achieving women’s empowerment in all facets of life.

      Stéphane Dujarric, a spokesman for Secretary General António Guterres, said in an email that Mr. Guterres had suggested that the commission “hold a scaled-down meeting, limiting participation to New York-based representation,” which would sharply reduce the size and scope of the meeting and likely lead to the cancellation of numerous side events.

      Such moves are growing increasingly common. France is banning gatherings of more than 5,000 people in enclosed spaces and all gatherings in Oise, its region most affected by the coronavirus, the country’s health minister said on Saturday.

      Image

      Credit…Jeenah Moon for The New York Times

      There are signs that the epidemic could do meaningful economic damage.

      Stock markets had their worst week since 2008, with the S&P index falling 11.5 percent, and bond yields already suggest that the outbreak could halt the longest expansion on record — 11 years — and even possibly send the nation into recession.

      While the economy is on an upward trend, many economists believe that the underlying fundamentals remain strong and that growth will continue, helping to insulate the country from a big shock.

      While the Federal Reserve may be considering interest rate cuts, it cannot replace the goods that would have been made by factories closed to keep workers from getting sick. President Trump said Saturday the Fed needed to move swiftly.

      A recession that lasts longer than a few months hasn’t occurred in the United States in more than 10 years.

      “Supply shock,” a reduction in the economy’s capacity to make things, is at the center of the economic problem emerging from the coronavirus. And American companies that rely heavily on Chinese suppliers might begin facing shortages of key goods in the coming weeks, said Nada Sanders, professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University.

      Reporting and research were contributed by Mike Baker, Michael Crowley, Peter Eavis, Donald G. McNeil Jr., Choe Sang-Hun, Thomas Fuller, Sheri Fink, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Raphael Minder, Amy Qin, Sui-Lee Wee, Vivian Wang, Katie Rogers, Raymond Zhong, Apoorva Mandavilli, Peter Robins, Derrick Taylor, Norimitsu Onishi, Motoko Rich and Makiko Inoue.

      All copyrights for this article are reserved to Viral 1 internet

      World War 3 memes start trending after US strike on Iranian official …

      World War 3 memes start trending after US strike on Iranian official …

      3 January 2020, 15:54 | Updated: 3 February 2020, 16:46

      President Donald Trump and Qassem Soleimani

      President Donald Trump and Qassem Soleimani.

      Picture:
      SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images, Pool / Press Office of Iranian Supreme Leader/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

      World War III started trending on Twitter after the killing of Iranian general Qasem Soleimani in a US airstrike.

      The internet has the ability to turn just about anything into a meme – no matter just how serious the topic is. On Friday (3 Jan), World War III memes started sweeping Twitter following news of growing tensions between the US and Iran.

      In 2018, US President Donald Trump decided to withdraw from Iran’s nuclear deal, which also includes the UK, France, China, Russia and Germany. The deal was struck up under former US President Barack Obama. In May 2019, the US blamed Iran for damaging four of their oil tankers off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, which they denied. Iran also shot down an American surveillance drone claiming it was in their airspace, although the US insisted it was in international territory.

      READ MORE: The best memes of 2020 (so far)

      This week (31 Dec), protesters stormed the US embassy in Baghdad and set fire to a guard tower and reception area. President Trump blamed Iran for being behind the attack.

      Why is World War 3 trending?

      World War 3 started trending after Iranian general Qasem Soleimani was killed in a US airstrike near Baghdad airport on the orders of President Donald Trump. The attack was conducted by an armed American drone, according to a US official, and eight others were also killed.

      On Twitter, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani promised Iran would “take revenge” following Soleimani’s death. There have already been protests in Iran and Kargil in India.

      The flag of General Soleimani in defense of the country’s territorial integrity and the fight against terrorism and extremism in the region will be raised, and the path of resistance to US excesses will continue. The great nation of Iran will take revenge for this heinous crime.

      — Hassan Rouhani (@HassanRouhani) January 3, 2020

      He tweeted: “The flag of General Soleimani in defense of the country’s territorial integrity and the fight against terrorism and extremism in the region will be raised, and the path of resistance to US excesses will continue. The great nation of Iran will take revenge for this heinous crime.”

      Soon, the internet were posting memes about the possibility of WWIII erupting.

      We really all hoped 2020 would be a peaceful year.

      We’re 2 days into 2020 and World War III is trending… maybe 2019 wasn’t so bad after all

      — Av (@Avkyz) January 3, 2020

      January 1st 2020: This is gonna be my year! Positive vibes!

      January 3rd 2020: ‘World War III’, ‘Russia and China’, ‘US and Iran’ and ‘ISIS’ are all trending on Twitter

      Me:

      pic.twitter.com/F7ii4Lqmfw

      — Joe (@JoeSaunders) January 3, 2020

      “WWIII” “Assasination” “Bin Laden “Pentagon” “Iran””World War III” and “United States” are all trending right now… 2020 was meant to be good vibes pic.twitter.com/m8HCr3RUrc

      — dr. Sir the second (@Dsocialengineer) January 3, 2020

      Memes aside, war is a serious matter. There are never any winners during war and masses of civilian lives could be lost – sadly, most probably on the Iranian side. Let’s hope it doesn’t come that.

      All copyrights for this article are reserved to Viral 1 internet

      World War 3 memes start trending after US strike on Iranian official …

      ‘Please do not kill us’: Actors John Cusack and Rose McGowan …

      TORONTO —
      A pair of outspoken Hollywood actors tweeted their scorn for U.S. President Donald Trump’s airstrike in Iraq, garnering a mix of backlash and support Friday.

      “Charmed” actress Rose McGowan, 46, tweeted an apology to Iran, writing that Americans “are being held hostage by a terrorist regime… Please do not kill us.”

      “High Fidelity” actor John Cusack, 53, tweeted about Trump’s action, which he called “full fascist 101 mode.”

      Trump’s airstrike on Friday that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani has been met with fear and patriotism. Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Vice-President Joe Biden said it was like Trump had “tossed a stick of dynamite into a tinderbox.” Some online suggested that Trump may have started a Third World War while supporters celebrated the action.

      Replies to Cusack and McGowan’s tweets include both sides, with some sharing their support, but much of the response falling on the malicious side, particularly on McGowan’s feed.

      The actress has become a prominent political voice among celebrities in recent years, often weighing in on a variety of issues. She is well known for her involvement in the “Me Too” movement and her accusations against alleged sexual predator Harvey Weinstein.

      Respondents implored McGowan to leave the country, and accused the actress of being on drugs and supporting a terrorist.

      In a follow-up tweet early Friday morning, McGowan added that “of course” the Iranian general was an “evil evil man who did evil evil things,” but that that was “not the f***ing point.”

      “The United States is morally corrupt and acts illegally. It is only logical to appeal to Iran’s pride by apologizing. I’m taking one for the team,” she wrote, adding the hashtag “Team Stay Alive.”

      Cusack has fielded his share of detractors for his political opinions over the years as a blogger for The Huffington Post during the Bush administration, which he called “depressing, corrupt, unlawful, and tragically absurd.” He also criticized the Obama administration’s drone policy.

      Cusack continued tweeting into Friday, writing that America should “remove this regime from power.”

      “This is where the fascism ends — in blood,” he continued. “Remove this criminal syndicate masquerading as a gov(ernment).”

      Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has vowed “harsh retaliation” after Trump’s airstrike.

      More airstrikes in Iraq were reported early Saturday, with one official declaring at least five members of a Iran-backed militia dead. The second attack came almost exactly 24 hours after Soleimani’s killing.

      Dear #Iran, The USA has disrespected your country, your flag, your people. 52% of us humbly apologize. We want peace with your nation. We are being held hostage by a terrorist regime. We do not know how to escape. Please do not kill us. #Soleimani pic.twitter.com/YE54CqGCdr

      — rose mcgowan (@rosemcgowan) January 3, 2020

      Of course #Soleimani was an evil evil man who did evil evil things. But that at this moment is not the fucking point. The United States is morally corrupt and acts illegally. It is only logical to appeal to Iran’s pride by apologizing. I’m taking one for the team. #TeamStayAlive

      — rose mcgowan (@rosemcgowan) January 3, 2020

      Trump in full fascist 101 mode-,steal and lie – untill there’s nothing left and start a war –


      He’s so idiotic he doesn’t know he just attacked Iran


      And that’s not like anywhere else

      — John Cusack (@johncusack) January 3, 2020

      This is where the fascism ends – in blood – remove this criminal syndicate masquerading as a gov –

      — John Cusack (@johncusack) January 3, 2020

      All copyrights for this article are reserved to Viral 1 internet

      World War 3 memes start trending after US strike on Iranian official …

      ‘Recipe for a Massive Viral Outbreak’: Iran Emerges as a Worldwide …

      Long a regional crossroads, Iran is spreading the new coronavirus to a host of neighboring countries. Many are ill equipped to cope.

      Iranians outside a Tehran hospital. Experts warn that the coronavirus may be spreading from Iran throughout the Middle East.Credit…Wana News Agency, via Reuters

      Religious pilgrims, migrant workers, businessmen, soldiers and clerics all flow constantly across Iran’s frontiers, often crossing into countries with few border controls, weak and ineffective governments and fragile health systems.

      Now, as it struggles to contain the spread of the coronavirus, Iran is also emerging as the second focal point after China for the spread of the disease. Cases in Iraq, Afghanistan, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Lebanon, the United Arab Emirates — even one in Canada — have all been traced to Iran, sending tremors of fear rippling out from Kabul to Beirut.

      The Middle East is in many ways the perfect place to spawn a pandemic, experts say, with the constant circulation of both Muslim pilgrims and itinerant workers who might carry the virus. Iran’s economy has been strangled by sanctions, its people have lost trust in their government and its leaders are isolated from much of the world, providing little clarity about the extent of the epidemic.

      Civil wars or years of unrest have shattered the health systems of several neighboring countries, like Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and Yemen. And most of the region is governed largely by authoritarians with poor track records at providing public transparency, accountability and health services.

      “It is a recipe for a massive viral outbreak,” said Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the former founding executive director of the Joint United Nations Program on H.I.V./AIDS.

      Millions of Muslim pilgrims travel each year from around the region to visit Shiite holy sites in Iran and Iraq. In January alone, 30,000 people returned to Afghanistan from Iran, and hundreds of others continue to make the pilgrimage to Qom, the site of the outbreak, every week, Afghan officials say.

      Iraq closed its border with Iran on Saturday, but millions cross it every year. So scores of infected people could potentially have brought the virus to Iraq, depending on how long it has been present in Iran. And as of midday on Monday in Najaf, flights to and from Iran were still taking off and landing.

      Governors of Iraqi provinces bordering Iran were taking the potential for contagion seriously and at least two were personally inspecting the border crossings to ensure that they were being policed and that Iranians were barred from crossing into Iraq.

      Qutaybah al-Jubouri, the head of the Iraqi Parliament’s Health Affairs Committee, called the coronavirus “a plague” and said his committee was demanding a far more complete closure of all “land, sea and air” borders with Iran “until the disease is completely controlled.”

      Image

      Medical workers checking temperatures of those arriving at Baghdad International Airport from Iran. Experts worry it may be too late for Iraq to stop the spread of the virus there.Credit…Ahmed Jalil/EPA, via Shutterstock

      Iran’s health ministry sent a letter to the governor of Qom on Thursday and asked Shiite religious leaders to limit the number of pilgrims at the Shrine to Fatima Masumeh and other religious sites in the city, but as of early Tuesday, throngs of people still gathered around the shrine, touching it and taking part in communal prayers.

      Iran is in many ways a case study in the risks of the disease spreading. The country reported its first case of the coronavirus less than a week ago, in Qom. On Tuesday, health officials reported that a total to 15 people had died after contracting the virus. At least 95 others had been infected in Iran, the officials said, with new cases being reported in Isfahan, Hamedan and other cities, as well as in Qom.

      Now the slow drip of news about the spread of the virus is compounding Tehran’s already acute credibility problems, less than two months after officials were forced to admit lying about their knowledge of the accidental downing of a Ukrainian passenger jet by air defense systems. Many Iranians on Monday were openly skeptical about the official accounts of the spread of the virus.

      A member of Parliament representing Qom claimed on Monday that at least 50 people had already died there, including 34 in quarantine, and that the first case had been reported more than two weeks before officials acknowledged any infections.

      “Every day 10 people are dying in Qom,” the lawmaker, Ahmad Amiri Farahani, asserted in a speech to Parliament, demanding a quarantine on his city.

      Health ministry officials vehemently disputed his claims. “I will resign if the numbers are even half or a quarter of this,” said Iraj Harirchi, adviser to the health minister.

      Adding to the public anxiety, the Iranian news media reported that Dr. Mohamad Reza Ghadir, the head of a medical university in Qom and the top official in charge of managing the outbreak there, was among those placed in quarantine.

      On Monday, Dr. Ghadir said on Iran’s state television network that the health ministry had ordered city officials “not to publish any statistics” related to the outbreak in Qom. The situation there was “very dire and disease has spread across the city, ” he said.

      Iranians, distrusting the authorities, were ignoring official urgings to stay away from hospitals for fear of spreading the disease, instead crowding into emergency rooms to get themselves tested. Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran put up a triage tent outside to handle the overflow.

      Image

      Credit…Atta Kenare/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

      In an interview with BBC Persian from Tehran, Dr. Babak Gharaye Moghadam urged citizens to “please, please listen” to the advice of health officials and not to turn to social media feeds on their cellphones for guidance.

      The price of hospital masks was spiking across the region, including in Iran, Iraq, Lebanon and Afghanistan, where some were selling for as much as 30 times the usual cost.

      Experts worry that few Middle Eastern countries are ready to respond effectively to the threat posed by the virus.

      “How ready are these countries?” asked Dr. Montaser Bilbisi, an American-trained infectious disease specialist practicing in Amman, Jordan. “In all honesty, I have not seen the level of readiness that I have seen in China or elsewhere, and even some of the personal protective equipment is lacking.”

      In Jordan, for example, he said that he had not yet seen a fully protective hazardous materials suit. “So health care workers would be at very high risk for infection.”

      In Afghanistan, officials said the first confirmed case of the virus was a 35-year-old man from the western province of Herat who had recently traveled to Qom. Health officials declared a state of emergency in Herat. The government on Sunday had already suspended all air and ground travel to and from Iran.

      But the border is difficult to seal. Thousands cross every week for religious pilgrimages, trade, jobs and study — about 30,000 in January alone, the International Organization of Migration, an intergovernmental agency, reported.

      “In the past two weeks, more than a 1,000 people have visited or traveled to Qom from Herat, which means they come into closer contact with the virus,” the Afghan heath minister, Ferozuddin Feroz, said on Monday at a news conference in Kabul.

      As officials offered reassurances that they were ordering more hospital masks, residents were panicking about what other precautions to take.

      The son of a professor at a university in Herat, who returned three days ago from Iran, called a reporter for The New York Times on Monday asking what the procedure for quarantine was.

      “My father doesn’t show any signs of corona, but he and our family are worried,” the son, Mohamad Iman, said. “He’s locked himself up in a room where he just reads books. He has asked us to leave him some food and water at the door, but to stay away.”

      Image

      Credit…Hoshang Hashimi/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

      Saudi Arabia was the epicenter of a similar outbreak seven years ago, known as the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, that was transmitted from camels to humans.

      • Updated June 5, 2020

        • Does asymptomatic transmission of Covid-19 happen?

          So far, the evidence seems to show it does. A widely cited paper published in April suggests that people are most infectious about two days before the onset of coronavirus symptoms and estimated that 44 percent of new infections were a result of transmission from people who were not yet showing symptoms. Recently, a top expert at the World Health Organization stated that transmission of the coronavirus by people who did not have symptoms was “very rare,” but she later walked back that statement.

        • How does blood type influence coronavirus?

          A study by European scientists is the first to document a strong statistical link between genetic variations and Covid-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus. Having Type A blood was linked to a 50 percent increase in the likelihood that a patient would need to get oxygen or to go on a ventilator, according to the new study.

        • How many people have lost their jobs due to coronavirus in the U.S.?

          The unemployment rate fell to 13.3 percent in May, the Labor Department said on June 5, an unexpected improvement in the nation’s job market as hiring rebounded faster than economists expected. Economists had forecast the unemployment rate to increase to as much as 20 percent, after it hit 14.7 percent in April, which was the highest since the government began keeping official statistics after World War II. But the unemployment rate dipped instead, with employers adding 2.5 million jobs, after more than 20 million jobs were lost in April.

        • Will protests set off a second viral wave of coronavirus?

          Mass protests against police brutality that have brought thousands of people onto the streets in cities across America are raising the specter of new coronavirus outbreaks, prompting political leaders, physicians and public health experts to warn that the crowds could cause a surge in cases. While many political leaders affirmed the right of protesters to express themselves, they urged the demonstrators to wear face masks and maintain social distancing, both to protect themselves and to prevent further community spread of the virus. Some infectious disease experts were reassured by the fact that the protests were held outdoors, saying the open air settings could mitigate the risk of transmission.

        • How do we start exercising again without hurting ourselves after months of lockdown?

          Exercise researchers and physicians have some blunt advice for those of us aiming to return to regular exercise now: Start slowly and then rev up your workouts, also slowly. American adults tended to be about 12 percent less active after the stay-at-home mandates began in March than they were in January. But there are steps you can take to ease your way back into regular exercise safely. First, “start at no more than 50 percent of the exercise you were doing before Covid,” says Dr. Monica Rho, the chief of musculoskeletal medicine at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab in Chicago. Thread in some preparatory squats, too, she advises. “When you haven’t been exercising, you lose muscle mass.” Expect some muscle twinges after these preliminary, post-lockdown sessions, especially a day or two later. But sudden or increasing pain during exercise is a clarion call to stop and return home.

        • My state is reopening. Is it safe to go out?

          States are reopening bit by bit. This means that more public spaces are available for use and more and more businesses are being allowed to open again. The federal government is largely leaving the decision up to states, and some state leaders are leaving the decision up to local authorities. Even if you aren’t being told to stay at home, it’s still a good idea to limit trips outside and your interaction with other people.

        • What’s the risk of catching coronavirus from a surface?

          Touching contaminated objects and then infecting ourselves with the germs is not typically how the virus spreads. But it can happen. A number of studies of flu, rhinovirus, coronavirus and other microbes have shown that respiratory illnesses, including the new coronavirus, can spread by touching contaminated surfaces, particularly in places like day care centers, offices and hospitals. But a long chain of events has to happen for the disease to spread that way. The best way to protect yourself from coronavirus — whether it’s surface transmission or close human contact — is still social distancing, washing your hands, not touching your face and wearing masks.

        • What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

          Common symptoms include fever, a dry cough, fatigue and difficulty breathing or shortness of breath. Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. The C.D.C. has also added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

        • How can I protect myself while flying?

          If air travel is unavoidable, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself. Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A study from Emory University found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

        • How do I take my temperature?

          Taking one’s temperature to look for signs of fever is not as easy as it sounds, as “normal” temperature numbers can vary, but generally, keep an eye out for a temperature of 100.5 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. If you don’t have a thermometer (they can be pricey these days), there are other ways to figure out if you have a fever, or are at risk of Covid-19 complications.

        • Should I wear a mask?

          The C.D.C. has recommended that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting new concerns that the coronavirus is being spread by infected people who have no symptoms. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

        • What should I do if I feel sick?

          If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus or think you have, and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.

        • How do I get tested?

          If you’re sick and you think you’ve been exposed to the new coronavirus, the C.D.C. recommends that you call your healthcare provider and explain your symptoms and fears. They will decide if you need to be tested. Keep in mind that there’s a chance — because of a lack of testing kits or because you’re asymptomatic, for instance — you won’t be able to get tested.


      But even after seven years, Saudi Arabia, one of the richest countries in the world, has struggled to adapt state-of-the-art hygiene procedures to limit the spread of the virus within hospitals. A MERS outbreak last spring infected at least 61 people, killing eight of them.

      “Many hospitals in Saudi Arabia have improved but some could still do better at prevention,” said Dr. David L. Heymann, former chairman of Britain’s Health Protection Agency.

      In Iraq, the country with the most extensive border with Iran, only one case has been detected so far: that of a 22-year-old Iranian religious student in Najaf, Suhail Mohammad Ali.

      In the first comprehensive steps to combat the spread of the virus, the education department in Najaf on Monday postponed spring exams and the sacred Imam Ali Shrine was closed.

      The central government’s health department recommended avoiding crowded places, kissing or shaking hands.

      In Beirut, Lebanon, a 41-year-old woman who had traveled to Qom on a religious pilgrimage landed in Beirut on Thursday night and was found on Friday to have the virus. It was not until Monday, though, that the government issued an emergency plan, suggesting that travel to the affected areas be restricted and that arriving passengers be isolated at the airport if they showed symptoms.

      But no definite restrictions were ordered; not all passengers landing in Beirut in recent days have been screened; and another two planes from Qom were allowed to land in Beirut on Monday. Passengers on the plane carrying the infected Lebanese woman from Qom were told to quarantine themselves at home.

      The country’s health minister, Dr. Hamad Hasan, on Monday urged the Lebanese to stay calm. But Rabih Shaer, founder of a Lebanese nonprofit that campaigns against corruption, called the government’s sluggish response “irresponsible and criminal.”

      “Already the Lebanese population lost trust that this political class can face all the problems,” he said. “And now, until today, they still haven’t taken the right measures. There’s no transparency, there’s no accountability.”

      Dr. Nada Melhem, a virologist at the American University of Beirut who has been consulting with the Health Ministry, acknowledged that, “the level of panic in Lebanon is really high.”

      “But with systematic follow-up, we will be able to contain it,” she added. “Are we going to have some gaps? We will definitely have some, but I hope we can limit them as much as we can.”

      Reporting was contributed by Alissa Rubin from Baghdad, Vivian Yee from Beirut, Lebanon, Asadullah Timory from Herat, Afghanistan, and Fatima Faizi from Kabul, Afghanistan.

      All copyrights for this article are reserved to Viral 1 internet

      ‘Please do not kill us’: Actors John Cusack and Rose McGowan …

      ‘Please do not kill us’: Actors John Cusack and Rose McGowan …

      TORONTO —
      A pair of outspoken Hollywood actors tweeted their scorn for U.S. President Donald Trump’s airstrike in Iraq, garnering a mix of backlash and support Friday.

      “Charmed” actress Rose McGowan, 46, tweeted an apology to Iran, writing that Americans “are being held hostage by a terrorist regime… Please do not kill us.”

      “High Fidelity” actor John Cusack, 53, tweeted about Trump’s action, which he called “full fascist 101 mode.”

      Trump’s airstrike on Friday that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani has been met with fear and patriotism. Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Vice-President Joe Biden said it was like Trump had “tossed a stick of dynamite into a tinderbox.” Some online suggested that Trump may have started a Third World War while supporters celebrated the action.

      Replies to Cusack and McGowan’s tweets include both sides, with some sharing their support, but much of the response falling on the malicious side, particularly on McGowan’s feed.

      The actress has become a prominent political voice among celebrities in recent years, often weighing in on a variety of issues. She is well known for her involvement in the “Me Too” movement and her accusations against alleged sexual predator Harvey Weinstein.

      Respondents implored McGowan to leave the country, and accused the actress of being on drugs and supporting a terrorist.

      In a follow-up tweet early Friday morning, McGowan added that “of course” the Iranian general was an “evil evil man who did evil evil things,” but that that was “not the f***ing point.”

      “The United States is morally corrupt and acts illegally. It is only logical to appeal to Iran’s pride by apologizing. I’m taking one for the team,” she wrote, adding the hashtag “Team Stay Alive.”

      Cusack has fielded his share of detractors for his political opinions over the years as a blogger for The Huffington Post during the Bush administration, which he called “depressing, corrupt, unlawful, and tragically absurd.” He also criticized the Obama administration’s drone policy.

      Cusack continued tweeting into Friday, writing that America should “remove this regime from power.”

      “This is where the fascism ends — in blood,” he continued. “Remove this criminal syndicate masquerading as a gov(ernment).”

      Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has vowed “harsh retaliation” after Trump’s airstrike.

      More airstrikes in Iraq were reported early Saturday, with one official declaring at least five members of a Iran-backed militia dead. The second attack came almost exactly 24 hours after Soleimani’s killing.

      Dear #Iran, The USA has disrespected your country, your flag, your people. 52% of us humbly apologize. We want peace with your nation. We are being held hostage by a terrorist regime. We do not know how to escape. Please do not kill us. #Soleimani pic.twitter.com/YE54CqGCdr

      — rose mcgowan (@rosemcgowan) January 3, 2020

      Of course #Soleimani was an evil evil man who did evil evil things. But that at this moment is not the fucking point. The United States is morally corrupt and acts illegally. It is only logical to appeal to Iran’s pride by apologizing. I’m taking one for the team. #TeamStayAlive

      — rose mcgowan (@rosemcgowan) January 3, 2020

      Trump in full fascist 101 mode-,steal and lie – untill there’s nothing left and start a war –


      He’s so idiotic he doesn’t know he just attacked Iran


      And that’s not like anywhere else

      — John Cusack (@johncusack) January 3, 2020

      This is where the fascism ends – in blood – remove this criminal syndicate masquerading as a gov –

      — John Cusack (@johncusack) January 3, 2020

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      Coronavirus: Battling a Pandemic Is a Job for the Military – Bloomberg

      Coronavirus: Battling a Pandemic Is a Job for the Military – Bloomberg

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      Coronavirus: Battling a Pandemic Is a Job for the Military – Bloomberg

      Facebook to warn users who “liked” coronavirus hoaxes

      Posted: Thu 1:33 PM, Apr 16, 2020
      &nbsp|&nbsp

      Updated: Thu 7:33 PM, Apr 16, 2020





      NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook will soon let you know if you shared or interacted with dangerous coronavirus misinformation on the site, the latest in a string of aggressive efforts the social media giant is taking to contain an outbreak of viral falsehoods.


      FILE – This March 29, 2018, file photo shows the Facebook logo on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York’s Times Square. Facebook, Google and other platforms are taking unprecedented steps to protect public health as potentially dangerous coronavirus misinformation spreads around the world. In a possible first, Facebook removed a post by Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro that touted unproven viral benefits of a malaria drug, while Twitter nixed an associated video. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)


      The new notice will be sent to users who have clicked on, reacted to, or commented on posts featuring harmful or false claims about COVID-19 after they have been removed by moderators. The alert, which will start appearing on Facebook in the coming weeks, will direct users to a site where the World Health Organization lists and debunks virus myths and rumors.

      Facebook, Google and Twitter are introducing stricter rules, altered algorithms and thousands of fact checks to stop the spread of bad misinformation online about the virus.

      Challenges remain. Tech platforms have sent home human moderators who police the platforms, forcing them to rely on automated systems to take down harmful content. They are also up against people’s mistrust of authoritative sources for information, such as the WHO.












      “Through this crisis, one of my top priorities is making sure that you see accurate and authoritative information across all of our apps,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote on his Facebook page Thursday.

      The company disclosed Thursday that it put more than 40 million warning labels in March over videos, posts or articles about the coronavirus that fact-checking organizations have determined are false or misleading. The number includes duplicate claims — the labels were based on 4,000 fact checks.

      Facebook says those warning labels have stopped 95% of users from clicking on the false information.

      “It’s a big indicator that people are trusting the fact checkers,” said Baybars Orsek, the director of the International Fact-Checking Network. “The label has an impact on people’s information consumption.”

      But Orsek cautioned that the data Facebook provided should be reviewed by outside editors or experts, and called on the historically secretive company to release regular updates about the impact of its fact-checking initiative.

      Orsek’s organization is a nonprofit that certifies news organizations as fact checkers, a requirement to produce fact-checking articles for Facebook. Facebook has recruited dozens of news organizations around the globe to fact check bad information on its site. The Associated Press is part of that program.












      Facebook will also begin promoting the articles that debunk COVID-19 misinformation, of which there are thousands, on a new information center called “Get The Facts.” Putting trustworthy information in front of people can be just as useful, if not more, than simply debunking falsehoods.

      Still, conspiracy theories, claims about unverified treatments, and misinformation about coronavirus vaccines continue to pop up on the site daily— sometimes circumventing the safeguards Facebook has implemented.

      The new notification feature also only applies to posts on users’ main news feed — not in groups, where misinformation often spreads unchecked, and not on WhatsApp or Instagram, though Facebook has put some other protections in place on those platforms.

      That means a lot of users won’t get the new alert from Facebook, said Stephanie Edgerly, an associate professor at Northwestern University who researches audience engagement. She said many users might simply see a false claim in their Facebook feed but not share, like or comment on it.



      “A lot of what we know about how people scroll through their news feed not clicking on things, they still reading posts or headlines, without clicking on the link,” Edgerly said.

      Facebook users, for example, viewed a false claim that the virus is destroyed by chlorine dioxide nearly 200,000 times, estimates a new study out today from Avaaz, a left-leaning advocacy group that tracks and researches online misinformation.

      The group found more than 100 pieces of misinformation about the coronavirus on Facebook, viewed millions of times even after the claims had been marked as false or misleading by fact checkers. Other false claims were not labeled as misinformation, despite being declared by fact-checkers as false.

      “Coronavirus misinformation content mutates and spreads faster than Facebook’s current system can track it,” Avaaz said in its report.

      This is especially problematic for Italian and Spanish misinformation, the report said, because Facebook has been slower to issue warning labels on posts that aren’t in English. Avaaz also noted that it can take as long as 22 days for Facebook to label misinformation as such — giving it plenty of time to spread.

      False claims about coronavirus treatments have had deadly consequences.

      Last month, Iranian media reported more than 300 people had died and 1,000 were sickened in the country after ingesting methanol, a toxic alcohol rumored to be a remedy through private social media messages.

      __

      AP Technology Writer Matt O’Brien in Providence, Rhode Island, contributed to this story.

      Copyright 2020 Associated Press. All rights reserved.







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